0 4 min 4 weeks

“I’m anxious to promote rodeo and the Western way of life to more people who don’t know about it.” 

Macey Wapp, Frankfort, is excited to fulfill duties coming with her title as Miss Rodeo Topeka 2022-23. 

Crowned at this year’s rodeo in the North Topeka Saddle Club Arena, the 15-year-old cowgirl competed in six pageant categories. 

“I was so nervous shaking all over when they announced my name, it took a while to soak in,” Macey admitted. 

Horsemanship, public speaking, modeling, interview, rodeo knowledge, and impromptu speech divisions were in the competition with three judges.  

Runner-up for this year’s Miss Rodeo Topeka title was Evalynn Safferof Lawrence. 

“My experience riding and competing with horses since I was seven-years-old was sure to my advantage,” Macey commented. 

She has participated in youth rodeos throughout the area and collected several highpoint awards in saddle club shows.  

“I’m really fortunate to have a pair of outstanding horses to ride,” Macey appreciated. “I rode my sorrel mare called Ginger in the pageant because she has more experience in such activities. But my dark brown mare Snickers is a great rodeo event horse too.” 

Serving as Miss Rodeo Topeka seems to be a Wapp family tradition. “My sister Sydney, 17, was the 2018-19 queen, so being crowned this year was extra special to me,” Macey said.  

“I really appreciate the strong support given to me by my parents Joe and Jodie Wapp,” Macey acknowledged. “I count on Sydney and our older sister, Tiffany McGuire, also a cowgirl, for encouragement and advice.” 

Joe Wapp works at the Frankfort Co-op, while Jodie Wapp is dietician at the Marysville hospital. “Mom is responsible for helping me with my outfits and other preparations,” Macey said. “Dad takes care of our transportation making sure my horses are ready to go at showtime.” 

A freshman at Frankfort High School, Macey is a versatile athlete. Besides being a cowgirl, she participates in volleyball, basketball, softball, and track.  

“I am really interested in agriculture, so I’m enrolled in vocational agriculture classes and plan to join FFA.” she said. 

A leader in 4-H club work, Macey had the grand champion horse entry at the Marshall County Fair in Blue Rapids. 

Excited about rodeo promotion in the months ahead, Macey has no plans for slowdown in horse event competition.  

“I will continue participating in barrel racing and other speed events,” she said. “I’ve done limited goat tying and hope to expand that as well as possibly start doing some breakaway roping.” 

While high school graduation is sometime away, Macey anticipates attending Highland Community College. “I intend to study animal agriculture and hopefully go on to Kansas State University in Manhattan,” she said. “I would like to be on the rodeo team and also participate in other college sports if it works out.” 

Optimistic for rodeo, Macey said, “This great sport helps teach youth responsibility developing opportunities and relationships for all aspects of life. I sure expect to be riding horses and competing in rodeo events throughout my lifetime.”